Facial Paralysis in Longitudinal versus Oblique and Otic-Sparing versus Non Otic-Sparing Temporal Bone Fractures

  • Ruben J. Chua Jr. Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Amang Rodriquez Memorial Medical Center https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4921-0872
  • Rene C. Lacanilao Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Amang Rodriquez Memorial Medical Center
Keywords: head injuries, head trauma, skull fracture, temporal bone fracture, motor vehicles, traffic accidents, facial paralysis

Abstract

Objective: To compare the proportion of temporal bone fractures using traditional (longitudinal vs. transverse) and otic involvement (otic sparing vs. non-otic sparing) classification schemes and their relationship with the development of facial paralysis.

Methods:

        Design:           Retrospective Case Series

        Settings:         Tertiary Government Hospital

Patients:         Records of 49 patients diagnosed with temporal bone fracture in our institution from August 2016 to June 2018.

Results: A total of 41 records of patients with temporal bone fractures, 32 males, 9 females, aged 5 to 70 years-old (mean 37.5-years-old) were included.  In terms of laterality 23 (56%) involved the right and 17 (41%) the left side.  Traditionally classified, 32 (78%) were longitudinal and 9 (22%) were transverse. Using newer classification based on otic involvement and non-otic involvement, 38 (93%) were otic-sparing and 3 (7%) were non otic-sparing. Only 9 (22%) out of 41 total fracture patients developed facial paralysis, involving 7 of the 32 longitudinal fractures and 2 of the 9 transverse fractures, or 8 of the 38 otic-sparing and 1 out of 3 non otic-sparing fractures.

Conclusion: Because of the small sample size, no conclusions regarding the proportion of temporal bone fractures using traditional (longitudinal vs. transverse) and otic involvement (otic sparing vs. non-otic sparing) classification schemes and their relationship with the development of facial paralysis can be drawn in this study.

Keywords: head injuries; head trauma; skull fracture; temporal bone fracture; motor vehicles; traffic accidents; facial paralysis     

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Published
2019-12-02
How to Cite
1.
Chua R, Lacanilao R. Facial Paralysis in Longitudinal versus Oblique and Otic-Sparing versus Non Otic-Sparing Temporal Bone Fractures . Philipp J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg [Internet]. 2019Dec.2 [cited 2019Dec.10];34(2):32-4. Available from: https://pjohns.pso-hns.org/index.php/pjohns/article/view/109